The Empty Shell of an Old Georgia Farmhouse

Unidentified House in a Pecan Grove | Berrien County, GA

I’ve held off on posting a full gallery of this property for many years because I was hoping to have been able to track down more of its story before I shared it with you. But sometimes even 4 years of research doesn’t bring you any closer to uncovering the past.

Besides tracking down the current property owners name, I’ve not had any luck making contact with them to ask more about it. And the more I have researched the property, the more I wonder if this was the original land where it sat. There are primitive electric outlets inside the home, but I don’t see signs of electricity leading to the property.

There are many indicators that it may have been moved- the foundation, the removed chimneys and rear porch- all tell a story. At some point, someone made the decision to remove those parts of the home- likely to stabilize it from sagging portions. But it seems the restoration work stopped there.

The simple, utilitarian beauty of this home made it a popular style across all of Georgia and is sometimes referred to as a Central Hall Farmhouse. Modest in appearance from the front, the rear ell nearly doubled the square footage and the rear porch, when it was still in tact, must’ve been impressive in size and useful for hot days on the farm.

 

Nestled perfectly beneath a well-tended and idyllic Pecan Grove, the home has some interesting details if you take the time to notice. Haint Blue trim on the window frames, porch ceiling, and interior beadboard. Four rear exit doors that as one time led to what I imagine was a lovely porch. Chimneys that bookended the home and fireplaces to warm both sides.

The home may seem forlorn, but the land around it is well tended. Nearby stands an iconic style of Georgia barn that appears to be from the same time frame as the home.

Another mystery along a Southern road that I will be happy to solve someday.

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